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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
testimony forensic officials are due on the stand to talk about how jennifer hawke-petit and her daughters michaela and hayley died. they learned about photos and text messages found on the cell phones of the two defendants steven hayes and joshua komisarjevsky. jeff is here and i appreciate that help on that. that last name, no vowels. anyway, fill me in on exactly what is taking place and why the text messages are so disturbing. >> the text messages are disturbing, everything is disturbing in this case. it's the night before they actually went in and then invaded the petit's home and they're setting it up. i want to put it on the screen so you can see exactly how heartless this was. 7:45 p.m. hayes says i am chomping at the bit to get started. need a margarita soon. he writes, we still on? and komisarjevsky writes back yes. and he says, soon? komisarjesky writes i'm putting the kid to bed. these are two guys that are talking like they are going to get a beer at a local bar and meanwhile, they are about to go, according to prosecutors, invade this family's home in the middle of the night
. >> jennifer, remind our audience again of the lyrics to this cheer that you found so offensive and the first time that you heard it. >> the first time i heard it was a few weeks ago after my daughter came home from practice and she told me one of the cheers and the lyrics are, our back's fake, we shake our booties from left to right. at that point i was just kind of in shock and right away, the next day i addressed it with the coach and the general manager of the wolverines. >> what did they say to you. >> at that time the general manager was kind of like, well, we have been doing it they way for years. the coach said she really doesn't have any power, she would take it to the general manager, she would like me to address it with the general manager, but since she doesn't have any of the power, we'll see what they say. they came back the following day and at that time, she said, you know, they have been doing it that way for 20 years t board is aware, so you can either have your daughter sit out or that's it. now, she also told me that the cheers were mandated at that time by the association
. jennifer davis has more. >> reporter: a group of 30 religious leaders, including priests, rabbis and preachers are meeting in d.c. they want to make it clear that while there are deaf rens in their belief, they're coming together to deject and denounce hateful anti-muslim rhetoric. the group of leaders joined to where they crafted a joint statement calling for respect of what one of america's greatest items are, freedom of religious and they talking with the attorney general this afternoon. in light of a surge and attacks on muslims around the country, the controversy about the building of a mosque near ground zero and now the florida pastor's plans to burn the q'uran, they want to talk with the attorney general about spins the department of justice can take against anti-muslim hate and acts of violence. the faith group said as we approach the anniversary of 9/11, muslims and america are growing scared and religious leaders are growing concerned. >> america was not built on hatred but love. if we get away from that and try to give that message out to the world, it's the wrong me
the program started. during that conversation, jennifer, dave and judy convince me that we should create a group like mothers against drunk driving. the idea would be a national advocacy group devoted to ending distracted driving. that was born in the studios of cnn. during the year since, jennifer, dave, judy and other members have travelled the country doing important and inspiring work, putting a human face on a terrible problem. at last year's summit, we learned that distracted driving is an epidemic. it is an epidemic because everyone has a cell phone, and everyone thinks they can use it while driving. you all know this. if i asked for a show of hands -- which i am not going to do [laughter] -- i know that everyone of you has a self done. and i also know that everyone has used it while driving. do not deny it. we are hooked on it. that is why it is an epidemic. there is no bigger distraction than people on a cell phone or people texting and driving. there is not. you cannot drive safely doing that. i want to say a special word of thanks to the chief of police of washington, d.c. she
of illinois. joining me now to talk about this is deputy personal finance editor jennifer merritt. she oversaw the research for the "wall street journal." the bottom line here is for that first job, businesses seem to be preferring not the ivy leagues, but others. these are no slouch schools. this is not like, oh, gosh, let's take second best. those are great schools. why, though, this over the ivy leagues? >> for these entry level jobs people are hoping to grow candidates into the company with. and so one of the reasons is they come very academically prepared. they've all had a major. so they've really got the great, deep skills in a subject. and then because they've got to really fend for themselves at these big schools and take advantage of various resources and network and the wide networks. they're also sort of able to come in, hit the ground running, and that well roundedness. >> ivy league graduates are seen as less -- >> they're less technically prepared in a lot of ways. most ivy league schools don't have majors in a traditional sense, don't have a lot of that bread and butter course
. >> jennifer grant haholm from michigan. a good piece of this comes from a program which allows our automotive suppliers to go to a bank and have access to loans that otherwise might not have had because of the crunch on credit. it allows them to be able to invest in machining, to diversify and move into areas like medical devices or alternative energy. the bottom line for michigan and for all of the states, and certainly for the businesses, is that this means jobs. michigan's program was very small and will now be significantly more robust. state programs will be able to create or maintain 11,000 jobs, $800 million worth of credits that will keep people employed in michigan and make business is stronger as the move to this difficult time. this is a great bill for us. hopefully it is a great bill for the people who are working for these businesses or will be working for these businesses. i am thrilled to be here and say thank you to the president for signing this bill that gives people opportunity. >> my name is stephen neal. i would like to think the president for the stimulus package as well
glasses and she would be a dead ringer. oh, my god, no. which one is bridget fonda? which one is jennifer jason lee? i don't know what's going on. >> boy, a lot of material there. >> christine mcdonnell. >> o'donnell -- >> being make en fun of. good morning, welcome to a special edition of "morning joe." we're live at the national mall in front of the capitol building. if you're watching, you probably know what that big thing behind me is. >> it's so great to be here. >> we're not the only ones here. >> no. a lot of folks here today. congress returned to town this week facing daunting decisions and an increasingly restless nation. the big question, can washington pass legislation before the 2010 election that will begin to get america back to work. >> we'll be talking to republicans and democrats to see if they can make progress before what barack obama called the silly season -- >> right, it's back. >> obviously back, in some states more than others. >> oh, now. >> actually there's a little bit of hope for compromise on taxes. yesterday you had the majority leader, steny hoyer, talking a
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)